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What primer is used in 500 S&W cases?

Hornady's original cases for the 500 S&W were made with Large Pistol Primer pockets. New cases are marked "LR" and made with a Large Rifle Primer Pocket.

Categorized in: Reloading Tools

How do I adjust trickle speed on the Lock-N-Load® Auto Charge, serial number below 2840, to prevent overthrows?

**To verify the serial number of your machine, simply turn it over. It is clearly stamped on the silver sticker.

Reprogram the trickle speed to a slower speed.

Turn unit on and let it stabilize. Press the "0" button. (Unit should beep once.) Press the CAL button once. A number between 0.0 and 25.5 will appear. Press CAL... Continue Reading

Categorized in: Reloading Tools

How do I adjust trickle speed on a Lock-N-Load® Auto Charge, serial number 2840 or above, to prevent overthrows?

**To verify the serial number of your machine, simply turn it over. It is clearly stamped on the silver sticker.

Reprogram the trickle speed to a slower speed.

Turn unit on and let it stabilize. Press and hold CAL button for 6 seconds. The screen will display "SET." Press the SPEED button to increase the speed. Normal... Continue Reading

Categorized in: Reloading Tools

Why isn't the rifle bullet feeder compatible with the pistol bullet feeder?

There are five main reasons:

The pistol bullet feeder has a 120-volt electrical system (power supply, motor and electrical connector). The rifle bullet feeder has a 12-volt electrical system to eliminate the potential for electrical shock from a 120-volt system. The rifle bullet feeder has a shutoff switch to prevent... Continue Reading

Categorized in: Reloading Tools

What calibers can I hand load or reload with Hodgdon Superformance powder?

Hornady started loading the Superformance line of ammunition in 2010. Hodgdon followed up with the introduction of a Superformance powder available for hand loaders. However, the one Superformance powder that Hodgdon sells is not usable in all rifle calibers. Like all powders, it has a particular burn rate and will work great in... Continue Reading

Categorized in: Reloading Tools

Why are the drag curves convex nearly immediately if the effects are only significant at longer ranges?

For most projectiles, the effect of the tip beginning to change shape is nearly immediate. From the graph of the drag coefficient (Cd) vs. distance above, you can see that the change in the drag of the projectile starts to happen immediately and accelerates until it stabilizes at about 300 yards. This is for a high ballistic coefficient (BC)... Continue Reading

Categorized in: Heat Shield Technology

Couldn’t limit cycle yaw cause what you are seeing with the drag coefficient at supersonic velocities?

Not with anything other than a grossly under-stabilized projectile. If limit cycle yaw was the root cause of the observed increase in drag short range, we would have seen the same drag signature regardless of tip used. Limit cycle yaw is a phenomenon associated with some projectiles in which, because of their shape and their stability,... Continue Reading

Categorized in: Heat Shield Technology

Would insufficient spin rate cause what you're seeing in the drag behavior of some of these projectiles?

In situations involving extreme lack of gyroscopic stability (Sg), effects similar to what we witnessed could contribute to the effects we observed. Extensive radar testing proves this is not what is occurring. We perform extensive bullet modeling for both mass and aerodynamic properties using state-of-the-art, military-grade software called... Continue Reading

Categorized in: Heat Shield Technology

Would the drop in BC you claim to see be caused by the normal change in BC at lower velocities?

No, it would not. The drop in ballistic coefficient (BC) associated with a bullet flying down range as it slows down is driven by two things. First, it is caused mostly by the drag coefficient (Cd) versus Mach number (drag model) of the standard not being at all like the actual drag coefficient versus Mach number of the projectile that is... Continue Reading

Categorized in: Heat Shield Technology

If the BC degrades with older tip material, how accurate are trajectory predictions?

They become progressively more inaccurate beyond ranges of 300 to 400 yards. The effects of changing ballistic coefficients (BC) with distance can be modeled with several commercially available ballistic calculators, but it is virtually impossible to know what the actual BC changes are without Doppler radar data. Reducing velocity to measure the simulated BC in mid-flight does not reflect the effects of aerodynamic heating on the tip.

Categorized in: Heat Shield Technology